Garlic Scape Jam

Must Try

Garlic scape jam is a unique way to enjoy fresh garlic scapes in season.  If you’re growing hardneck garlic, you’ll have plenty of garlic scapes around, and there’s no more creative way to preserve them!

We grow hundreds of garlic bulbs each year, and when you’re growing garlic, you’re also growing garlic scapes. 
Garlic scapes are the flowering portion of the garlic plant, and they shoot up in early summer or late spring each year.  If you don’t cut off the scape, the bulb won’t develop fully, and your garlic crop will be half the size.
But that’s not really a big deal, it just means you get to harvest a garlic scape for each garlic bulb you plant…enjoying a bit more garlic flavor each year.
Scapes have a mild garlic/chive-type flavor, with more “green” and less garlic heat.  I often make them into garlic scape pesto, but they also work surprisingly well in this homemade garlic scape jam.

Ingredients for Garlic Scape Jam
This recipe happens to be a tested canning recipe from Bernardin.  I know, it’s a wierd one, but they really did intentioanlly develop this savory garlic scape jam…and it’s delicious.
I’ve made a few changes to improve the color, as they used balsamic vinegar and brown sugar (which turned everything a dark brown), and made for a visually unappealing jam.  I switched it out to white wine vinegar and white sugar, both of which are acceptable changes for canning safety. 
To make six 4-ounce jars of scape jam, you will need the following: 

3 cups pureed scapes
1 cup dry white wine
½ cup white wine vinegar (5% acidity)
2 tsp black pepper (optional)
½ tsp dried oregano (optional)
½ tsp dried basil (optional)
1 box pectin (1.75 oz)
3½ cups sugar

Do not decrease the amount of vinegar or sugar in this jam, both are used for preservation.  You can change the type of vinegar (provided it’s standardized to 5% acidity).  If you don’t have white wine, use wine vinegar in its place.  The wine is also acidic, and helps to preserve this jam.  You cannot replace it with water, but you can replace it with more vinegar.
If you’re buying garlic scapes from the farmer’s market, you’ll need about 2-3 average-sized bundles for this recipe.

How to Make Garlic Scape Jam
Prepare six 4-ounce jars, lids, bands, and hot water canner. If you are a beginner or are unsure of hot water bath canning, refer to my Beginner’s Guide to Water Bath Canning before proceeding.
Wash the scapes under clear, cool water and allow them to drain.
Coarsely chop the scapes by hand, and then puree or finely chop the scapes in a food processor. Measure out 3 cups.
In a deep, stainless steel or non-reactive saucepan, combine the pureed scapes with 1 cup of dry white wine.
Place the pan on the stove over medium-high heat and bring the mixture to a boil.
Cover and simmer gently for 3 – 5 minutes, until the scapes are fully cooked, stirring occasionally to prevent sticking.
Measure 3½ cups of brown sugar and set aside.   Do not add the sugar yet.
Add the vinegar vinegar, black pepper, oregano, and basil to the scape mixture and stir to combine.
Add the package of pectin to the scape mixture. Stir to completely dissolve the pectin. The butter is to reduce foaming while the mixture cooks.
Bring the mixture to a full rolling boil over high heat. A rolling boil will not stop boiling as you stir it. 
Add all the sugar to the boiling mixture, stirring constantly, and return to a rolling boil. Continue the hard boil for 1 full minute, stirring constantly.
Turn off the heat, remove the saucepan from the stove, and skim off foam if necessary.
Working quickly, use a canning funnel to pour or ladle the jam into the hot, sterilized jars, leaving ¼” headspace at the top. Use a rubber spatula or silicone utensil to remove any air bubbles from the jars. Add more jam if necessary to maintain the ¼” headspace.
Using a clean, damp cloth, wipe the rims of the jars to ensure a good seal, then apply the canning lids and rings. The rings should only be tightened to “finger-tight.”

Canning Garlic Scape Jam
Spoon or pour the cooked scape jam into hot, prepared jars using a canning funnel, leaving ¼” headspace at the top. Wipe the rims of the jars clean and attach 2-part canning lids.
Using a jar lifter, place the filled jars into the prepared canner with boiling water. Ensure that the jars are covered by at least 1” of water. Return the water to boiling, then set the timer to process the jars for 10 minutes (or 15 minutes above 6000 feet in elevation). Ensure the jars are completely covered with water during the entire processing time.
After the processing time is complete, turn off the heat and remove the cover from your canner. Leave the jars in the water for 5 minutes, then use a jar lifter to remove them from the canner and set them to cool on a towel on the counter.  Do not tip the jars or wipe excess water off the lids. Let the jars sit undisturbed for at least 12 hours.
Check the jars after 12-24 hours to see if the lids have sealed. There should be a depression in the center of the lid. If the lids still have a “bubble” in the center of the lid, continue to let it set. If it does not seal, store it in the refrigerator for immediate use. 
Store sealed jars in a pantry or cool, dark place for up to 18 months. Once you have opened a jar, refrigerate it and use it within two weeks.

Garlic Scape Jam Variations
This recipe can be made using any variety of cooking wine, such as red or cooking sherry.
Variations in vinegar will also change the final flavor. Instead of balsamic vinegar, use apple cider vinegar to create a new, distinct flavor for your jam.  
Substituting the brown sugar for regular granulated sugar, turbinado, or maple sugar can produce different flavor results.
Ways to Use Garlic Scape Jam
Garlic Scape Jam is an easy way to add the wonderful flavor of garlic scapes to almost anything you like!  
Sandwiches are particularly conducive to adding garlic scape jam, especially on roast beef or chicken. It is also delicious on hamburgers. 
Enjoy luscious chicken marinaded in garlic scape jam, or use it as a glaze on grilled meats.  
Vegetables are a delight when tossed with garlic scape jam and then roasted or broiled. Some of my favorites are potatoes, brussel sprouts, zucchini, and carrots.
A bagel topped with cream cheese and garlic scape jam makes a tasty treat any time of the day.

Yield: Makes six 4 oz jars (or three 8 oz jars)

Garlic Scape Jam

Prep Time:
10 minutes

Cook Time:
10 minutes

Total Time:
10 minutes

Garlic scape jam is a unique way to enjoy fresh garlic scapes in season.  It’s perfect on sandwiches or a charcuterie platter.

Ingredients

3 cups pureed scapes

1 cup dry white wine

½ cup white wine vinegar (5% acidity)

2 tsp black pepper (optional)

½ tsp dried oregano (optional)

½ tsp dried basil (optional)

1 box pectin (1.75 oz)

3½ cups sugar

Instructions
If canning, prepare your hot water bath and heat the jars.Wash the scapes with clean water, drain, and chop. Use a food processor or blender to puree or finely chop the scapes. Measure three cups of chopped scapes and place in a medium non-reactive saucepan or stock pot.Add 1 cup of wine and stir to combine.Over medium-high heat, cook the scapes and wine, bringing the mixture to a boil.Cover and simmer gently for 3 to 5 minutes, until the scapes are thoroughly cooked, stirring occasionally to prevent sticking.Measure 3½ cups sugar and set aside. Do not add the sugar yet!Add ½ cup of vinegar and the spices to the scape mixture and stir to combine.Add the package of pectin to the scape mixture, stirring constantly until pectin is dissolved. Over high heat, continue to stir the mixture until it has reached a full rolling boil, which is a boil that will not stop as you stir it.Add the premeasured sugar to the boiling mixture and stir to dissolve.Return the mixture to a full rolling boil, and boil hard for 1 minute, stirring constantly.Remove the pan from the heat and skim off any foam if desired.Working quickly, pour or ladle the hot jam into prepared hot jars, leaving ¼” headspace at the top of the jars. Use a rubber spatula or silicone utensil to remove any air bubbles from the filled jars. Add additional jam if necessary to maintain the ¼” headspace.Wipe the rims of the jars with a damp, clean cloth and apply the 2-part canning lids.Preserve the jam using a hot water bath canning method for 10 minutes (or 15 minutes if above 6,000 feet in elevation).After processing, turn off the heat and leave jars in the canner, uncovered, for 5 minutes. Remove the jars from the canner and let them cool for 12-24 hours, then check that the jars are sealed. Refrigerate any unsealed jars.Sealed red onion jam will retain peak quality for up to 18 months stored in a cool, dry place or pantry. Refrigerate the jam once opened.

Garlic Scape Recipes
These garlic scape recipes will help you put this tasty crop to good use!

Savory Preserve Recipes
Looking for more savory jam & jelly recipes?

Latest Recipes

More Recipes Like This